Difficult difficult, difficult easy

I came across this story by Geoff Thompson by way of http://www.alwyncosgrove.com and I feel that if you are committed to personal excellence it is worthy of a few minutes of your day. PK

Think. Are you a Pump or Drain?

Think. Are you a Pump or Drain?

I bumped into an old friend from the distant past. In my early days as a hard-nosed knuckle-dragger he was one of my compatriots, and one of the hardest working martial artists around. He had always prided himself on his sinewy mentality when it came to all things physical, and he had a prolific work rate. After a brief (and predictable) catch up (how’s the work, the car, the kids, the wife and the mum – in that order) he said ‘hey, you still doing animal day?’

Animal day, for those that do not know, is a form of knock-out or submission fighting (any range, any technique) that I pioneered in the mad, bad (and often sad) 90’s. A time I absolutely loved, but a time I am also grateful to have left behind.

I shook my head in the negative. It had been a many years since I engaged in my last animal day fight.
‘Why not?’ he asked, adding, ‘I’m still mad for it.’

‘Because it is difficult easy,’ I said, ‘and in order for me to continue growing my character, I don’t need difficult easy. In order for me to grow my character I need difficult, difficult.’
He gave me one of those loud, squinty eyed confused looks that shouted from a hundred feet ‘Explain!’

So I explained.

Even as a veteran of thousands of fights, animal days were still a scary experience for me, it was violent and dangerous and extremely difficult. But because I had fought so many times and knew the terrain well it no longer stretched me.

Whatever it was that I needed to reap from that hard period of my life had been well and truly harvested; there was nothing left for me to learn there. Animal day was still difficult, and from the outside looking in it probably looked as though it was mad difficult, but for me it wasn’t, in fact it had become difficult easy.

My friend was still in love with the ground-and-pound style fighting and whilst his physical prowess was evident he had not grown even a single inch in any other area of his life, probably not for the last ten years. His was the mistake made by many; they presume that if something is difficult then they are in the arena. But experience has taught me that the only time you are truly in the arena is when you are (ever so slightly) out of your depth.

Difficult easy is when you are on familiar terrain, not matter how hard the going.

Difficult, difficult is when you find your self at the bottom of someone else’s class with three crazy training partners; fear at your left, doubt on your right and (that big bastard) uncertainty squaring up in front of you.

Difficult easy is treading water whilst kidding yourself that you are swimming against the tide.

Difficult difficult doesn’t need to employ pretense because it is drowning and swimming for its life.

I see many people suffering stalled development because they are so busy occupying themselves with very worthy, respectably, difficult easy tasks that they use to avoid the difficult difficult areas of their lives.

I am doing it right now as it happens. I should be doing a re-write of a difficult (difficult) film script that is over due, but instead I am busying myself with a piece of difficult (easy) work that is not really due to be in print for another fortnight (damn, caught myself out again!)

Some (more) examples; you bury your relationship problems (difficult difficult) under hundreds of miles of road running (difficult…but easy).

You fill every spare moment with hard lists of worthy causes (difficult easy) so that you don’t have the time to invest in the book that you were always going to write, or the film you would love to make (if only you were not so committed in other areas) or the (difficult…very difficult) painting career that you had always intended to create.

You immerse yourself in course after course, book after book (so difficult, and yet….so deliciously easy) on becoming a life coach/property developer/master chef instead of just getting out there (difficult, oh so difficult) and actually doing it.

Listen. Let me tell you, the moment a task becomes difficult easy you stop growing. That is a fact. In order to re-establish your vital development you need to take an honest inventory (difficult very difficult – I have done it) of your life, ditch the pretence, and embrace the black that is….difficult difficult.

And stop chasing ostentatious challenges (that are difficult easy for you) and sort out your health; you are three stone over weight and your blood pressure is off the scale.

Kill the worthy endeavors that you think other people will think are impressive and do something truly and uniquely impressive; take your (secret) addictions to task and kill the porn (in all its forms).

Stop collecting trophies and certificates and belts that tell the word how successful you are and actually BE a success, by taking a hammer to that creepily burgeoning fear that you are harboring.

And don’t, please (like my old mate) fall into the trap of mistaking hard work – even extremely hard (easy) work – for progress. Because, let’s be frank, difficult easy is really just another way of saying ‘easy’, and there is no growth in easy.

We aspirants are into the hard game, the long game, the difficult difficult game. What we are not into, or what we should not be into is the game of easy.

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My Friend Richard “Big Daddy” Salgado

The Dude That Helps St. Jude: The Richard Salgado Story

BigDaddyI am blessed with great friends who often do incredible acts of good in their lives. Richard “Big Daddy” Salgado is a friend of mine since we played football together at New Hyde Park Memorial High School in New York. He’s founded a successful insurance business and along life’s journey he nearly lost his life to a brain aneurism. Big Daddy, through Grace and medicine survived and now he gives back though his Big Daddy Celebrity Golf Classic which I attend each year. Please support Rich and his cause by sharing this story and come out to Long Island this summer if you can! Pete 

 Presented to you byEncouragement Speaker Derrick Hayes

I wanted to tell his story and help him like he has helped me so I took time out to share the news of Who, What, Where, When and Why Richard Salgado is “The Dude That Helps St. Jude.”

Who are you? I’m the CEO of Coastal Advisors, LLC Insurance Consultants and I have been in the insurance business for over 20 years. I have clients in various backgrounds which include Sports, Television, Media, Entertainment as well as business owners and families. I work with business owners on employee benefits, health insurance and many other forms of Insurance.

What are you planning to do? I’m hosting the 3rd Annual Big Daddy Celebrity Golf Classic to help raise money for the St Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis and for the Health Humanitarian Aid Foundation to help build schools and hospitals in Ghana, Africa. Last but not least we are raising money for North Shore University Hospital, which is the hospital that saved my life when I had an Aneurysm.

Past guests of the Annual Big Daddy Celebrity Golf Classic have been Michael Strahan, Current Co Host of Live with Kelly and MichaelJoe Buck, Fox Sports Commentator, Actor Singer Robert DaviAdam Schefter of ESPN and Superbowl Winning Coach Brian Billick of Baltimore Ravens.

Where and when are you going to do it? The Big Daddy Celebrity Golf Classic will be held at the World Famous Oheka Castle in Huntington, NY on Monday June 23rd, 2014. The Golf will be played on the Cold Spring CC which surrounds the Oheka Castle. For more information on the Oheka Castle please go to www.oheka.com.

Why are you doing it? I want to give back because I know that I’m blessed to be alive after my surgery and it feels great to be a part of a special work place. I used to be the one that helped my clients put on fund raisers, help find sponsors and raise money for their events so I took it upon myself to start my own foundation, The Big Daddy Foundation. Once I Hired Bob Broderick of RTB Media, LLC. to run my events and provide public relations we were off and running. It has been a fun ride but it also comes with alot of work. This year we decided to support St Jude’s Children’s Hospital, HHAF and North Shore Hospital.

I’m going to visit the St Jude’s Hospital in June before my event with two goals in mind. The first is to visit the hospital in hopes to bring some cheer to some of the kids that are in St Jude’s Care. The second goal I have is to make a video from St Jude’s to ask for support and let everyone know that they are my new benefactor.

Is there anything else that you would like to add?

I hope that everyone can attend the Big Daddy Celebrity Golf Classic. You can purchase a foursome, attend the VIP Celebrity Gala-Live Auction Dinner Party or just make a donation. All of these things can be done atwww.bigdaddygolfclassic.com.

People can follow me on FacebookTwitter and visit our insurance company websites at www.coastaladvisorsllc.com orwww.youtube.com/bigdaddyinsures.

Thank you Derrick and I look forward to this story getting out there for everyone to read so they can support our efforts in helping the St Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital, the Health Humanitarian Aid Foundation and the North Shore University Hospital.

Please visit Derrick’s website at http://www.DerrickHayes.com and to book him for a speaking engagement or media event, send an email to info@DerrickHayes.com  or call (706) 615-1662.

Heartbreak Ridge

I am regularly asked about my experience working on Heartbreak Ridge, the film I co-starred in with Mario Van Peebles and Clint Eastwood. For the record it was a remarkable experience in every way. When reflecting on the time making the movie, what truly stands out, was the absolute generosity of the film’s producer, director and star Clint Eastwood. The supporting cast and crew were friendly, committed and always professional. It was a dream to work with the exemplary group that were nearly all handpicked by Clint.

Here is a rare photo from the set of Heartbreak Ridge.

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